fairestcharming:

Men of period drama  (Ladies)

tagged → #literature #period drama

fairestcharming:

Ladies of period drama  (Men)

olga-nikolayevna:


DOWNTON ABBEY TIDE-OVER READING
The Downton Abbey series 5 trailer has premiered, teasing us about the first episode which will not premiere for another month! Long before Downton Abbey, I was a huge Edwardian history buff, and read these brilliant novels set among aristocracy in roughly the same time period

The Lost Crown by Sarah Miller: An accurate retelling of the most famous Edwardian princesses, the book follows “Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia. Like the fingers on a hand—first headstrong Olga; then Tatiana, the tallest; Maria the most hopeful for a ring; and Anastasia, the smallest. These are the daughters of Tsar Nicholas II, grand duchesses living a life steeped in tradition and privilege. They are each on the brink of starting their own lives, at the mercy of royal matchmakers. The summer of 1914 is that precious last wink of time when they can still be sisters together—sisters that link arms and laugh, sisters that share their dreams and worries, and flirt with the officers of their imperial yacht. But in a gunshot the future changes for these sisters and for Russia.”
Atonement by Ian McEwan: Set against the backdrop of the upper-class Tallis family’s country home and the carnage of the world war, “Ian McEwan’s symphonic novel of love and war, childhood and class, guilt and forgiveness provides all the satisfaction of a brilliant narrative and the provocation we have come to expect from this master of English prose. On a hot summer day in 1935, thirteen-year-old Briony Tallis witnesses a moment’s flirtation between her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the son of a servant and Cecilia’s childhood friend. But Briony’ s incomplete grasp of adult motives–together with her precocious literary gifts–brings about a crime that will change all their lives. As it follows that crime’s repercussions through the chaos and carnage of World War II and into the close of the twentieth century, Atonement engages the reader on every conceivable level, with an ease and authority that mark it as a genuine masterpiece.”
The Orchid House by Lucinda Riley: “spanning from the 1930s to the present day, from a magnificent estate in war-torn England to Thailand, this sweeping novel tells the tale of a concert pianist, Julia, and the prominent Crawford family whose shocking secrets are revealed, leading to devastating consequences for generations to come.”
The Forste Saga by John Galsworthy: “The three novels which make up The Forsyte Saga chronicle the ebbing social power of the commercial upper-middle class Forsyte family between 1886 and 1920. Galsworthy’s masterly narrative examines not only their fortunes but also the wider developments within society, particularly the changing position of women. This is the only critical edition of the work available, with Notes that explain contemporary artistic and literary allusions and define the slang of the time.”
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks: “this intensely romantic yet stunningly realistic novel spans three generations and the unimaginable gulf between the First World War and the present. As the young Englishman Stephen Wraysford passes through a tempestuous love affair with Isabelle Azaire in France and enters the dark, surreal world beneath the trenches of No Man’s Land, Sebastian Faulks creates a world of fiction…Crafted from the ruins of war and the indestructibility of love.”
The Glitter and The Gold: The American Duchess by Consuelo Vanderbilt, Lady Spencer: ”Consuelo Vanderbilt, Duchess of Marlborough’s memoir—the story of the “real” Lady Grantham of Downton Abbey. Consuelo Vanderbilt was young, beautiful, and heir to a vast fortune. She was also in love with an American suitor when her mother chose instead for her to marry an English Duke. She sailed to England as the Duchess of Marlborough in 1895 and took up residence in her new home—Blenheim Palace. She was the real American heiress who lived long before Downton Abbey’s Lady Grantham arrived.”
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh: “The most nostalgic and reflective of Evelyn Waugh’s novels, Brideshead Revisited looks back to the golden age before the Second World War. It tells the story of Charles Ryder’s infatuation with the Marchmains and the rapidly-disappearing world of privilege they inhabit. Enchanted first by Sebastian at Oxford, then by his doomed Catholic family, in particular his remote sister, Julia, Charles comes finally to recognize only his spiritual and social distance from them.”
Maurice by E.M. Foster: A novel my fellow Thommy fans will love, this classic book is “Set in the elegant Edwardian world of Cambridge undergraduate life, this story by a master novelist introduces us to Maurice Hall when he is fourteen. We follow him through public school and Cambridge, and on into his father’s firm, Hill and Hall, Stock Brokers. In a highly structured society, Maurice is a conventional young man in almost every way, “stepping into the niche that England had prepared for him: except that his is homosexual.”

olga-nikolayevna:

DOWNTON ABBEY TIDE-OVER READING

The Downton Abbey series 5 trailer has premiered, teasing us about the first episode which will not premiere for another month! Long before Downton Abbey, I was a huge Edwardian history buff, and read these brilliant novels set among aristocracy in roughly the same time period

The Lost Crown by Sarah Miller: An accurate retelling of the most famous Edwardian princesses, the book follows “Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia. Like the fingers on a hand—first headstrong Olga; then Tatiana, the tallest; Maria the most hopeful for a ring; and Anastasia, the smallest. These are the daughters of Tsar Nicholas II, grand duchesses living a life steeped in tradition and privilege. They are each on the brink of starting their own lives, at the mercy of royal matchmakers. The summer of 1914 is that precious last wink of time when they can still be sisters together—sisters that link arms and laugh, sisters that share their dreams and worries, and flirt with the officers of their imperial yacht. But in a gunshot the future changes for these sisters and for Russia.”

Atonement by Ian McEwan: Set against the backdrop of the upper-class Tallis family’s country home and the carnage of the world war, “Ian McEwan’s symphonic novel of love and war, childhood and class, guilt and forgiveness provides all the satisfaction of a brilliant narrative and the provocation we have come to expect from this master of English prose. On a hot summer day in 1935, thirteen-year-old Briony Tallis witnesses a moment’s flirtation between her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the son of a servant and Cecilia’s childhood friend. But Briony’ s incomplete grasp of adult motives–together with her precocious literary gifts–brings about a crime that will change all their lives. As it follows that crime’s repercussions through the chaos and carnage of World War II and into the close of the twentieth century, Atonement engages the reader on every conceivable level, with an ease and authority that mark it as a genuine masterpiece.”

The Orchid House by Lucinda Riley: “spanning from the 1930s to the present day, from a magnificent estate in war-torn England to Thailand, this sweeping novel tells the tale of a concert pianist, Julia, and the prominent Crawford family whose shocking secrets are revealed, leading to devastating consequences for generations to come.”

The Forste Saga by John Galsworthy: “The three novels which make up The Forsyte Saga chronicle the ebbing social power of the commercial upper-middle class Forsyte family between 1886 and 1920. Galsworthy’s masterly narrative examines not only their fortunes but also the wider developments within society, particularly the changing position of women. This is the only critical edition of the work available, with Notes that explain contemporary artistic and literary allusions and define the slang of the time.”

Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks: “this intensely romantic yet stunningly realistic novel spans three generations and the unimaginable gulf between the First World War and the present. As the young Englishman Stephen Wraysford passes through a tempestuous love affair with Isabelle Azaire in France and enters the dark, surreal world beneath the trenches of No Man’s Land, Sebastian Faulks creates a world of fiction…Crafted from the ruins of war and the indestructibility of love.”

The Glitter and The Gold: The American Duchess by Consuelo Vanderbilt, Lady Spencer: ”Consuelo Vanderbilt, Duchess of Marlborough’s memoir—the story of the “real” Lady Grantham of Downton Abbey. Consuelo Vanderbilt was young, beautiful, and heir to a vast fortune. She was also in love with an American suitor when her mother chose instead for her to marry an English Duke. She sailed to England as the Duchess of Marlborough in 1895 and took up residence in her new home—Blenheim Palace. She was the real American heiress who lived long before Downton Abbey’s Lady Grantham arrived.”

Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh: “The most nostalgic and reflective of Evelyn Waugh’s novels, Brideshead Revisited looks back to the golden age before the Second World War. It tells the story of Charles Ryder’s infatuation with the Marchmains and the rapidly-disappearing world of privilege they inhabit. Enchanted first by Sebastian at Oxford, then by his doomed Catholic family, in particular his remote sister, Julia, Charles comes finally to recognize only his spiritual and social distance from them.”

Maurice by E.M. Foster: A novel my fellow Thommy fans will love, this classic book is “Set in the elegant Edwardian world of Cambridge undergraduate life, this story by a master novelist introduces us to Maurice Hall when he is fourteen. We follow him through public school and Cambridge, and on into his father’s firm, Hill and Hall, Stock Brokers. In a highly structured society, Maurice is a conventional young man in almost every way, “stepping into the niche that England had prepared for him: except that his is homosexual.”

shinimegami:

It doesn’t matter how well-written, developed, and deep a character is, there will always be a group of people in the fandom that will reduce that character to 2 or 3 traits and then misinterpret everything they do based on those 2 or 3 traits which may or may not even be accurate to that character.

"October arrived, spreading a damp chill over the grounds and into the castle. Madam Pomfrey, the nurse, was kept busy by a sudden spate of colds among the staff and students. Raindrops the size of bullets thundered on the castle windows for days on end; the lake rose, the flower beds turned into muddy streams, and Hagrid’s pumpkins swelled to the size of garden sheds."
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling (via mugglenet)
When you have a large collection of books:
  • 1: Get ready for the most popular question: "Will you even read them all?"
  • 2: I hope you like book buying bans, because you will make them, then promptly break them multiple times a year...okay, maybe multiple times a month.
  • 3: If you dig through your shelves, you'll probably encounter a book you had no idea you owned.
  • 4: Book cataloguing is probably the best thing ever. Before you order those books online, make sure you don't already own them!
  • 5: A favourite phrase: "I own that book, but it's still on my tbr list."
  • 6: And, "Welcome to my library!"
  • 7: One last one, "Oh, I'm sorry, you said you had a lot of books...yeah, wait until you see my collection."
  • 8: Hm, how to make more room.
  • 9: More options for creative book pictures are at your finger tips.
  • 10: The struggle of finding something to read in a room full of books is real.
  • 11: It's scary how good you're getting at finding ways to get into your room with your new books without being spotted.
  • 12: It's even scarier how you're becoming an expert with justifying your huge book purchases.
  • 13: Ah, nothing like the smell of hundreds/thousands of books in the morning.
  • 14: Three words that will terrify any book collector: house fire, mold.
  • 15: Those books will be read one day, and if not, you'll pass them on to your kids!
  • 16: Who needs wall space, anyway?
  • 17: Make sure you take some Advil or Tylenol before you organize those shelves.
  • 18: Admit it, you love hearing a new friend's gasp of surprise when they see your collection.
  • 19: You know you already own a book that's suddenly popular...now, if only you could find it...
  • 20: For every five books you read, you'll probably by twice as many new books.
  • 21: Book borrowers beware: We might have a lot of books, but we know when you still haven't returned the one you borrowed.
coriclanus:

The tragedy of Macbeth

coriclanus:

The tragedy of Macbeth

tagged → #macbeth #shakespeare #plays

jjfeildd:

"Jane played her card, and after a moment stole a glance at Mr. Nobley. He’d been watching her, and when he looked away, guilt betrayed his forced serenity." – Austenland by Shannon Hale

parchmentsandquills:

booksandhotchocolate:

You know you read too much when you can spot a plot twist long before it even happens. 

image

That gif is so accurate.

manikinfear:

I love that feeling when you read a whole book in one sitting when you only intended to read a small amount.

doloresjaneumbridge:

Some snaps from my Harry Potter Reread - Part 1 [Part 2]